PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

International Journal of Progressive Education 2018, Vol. 14(1) 21-31

Adventures in Advising: Strategies, Solutions, and Situations to Student Problems in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Field

Carrie Mier

pp. 21 - 31   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2018.129.3

Published online: February 11, 2018  |   Number of Views: 79  |  Number of Download: 108


Abstract

Teaching and research are often the most focused upon aspects of working within academia in criminology and criminal justice (Sitren & Applegate, 2012; Jonson & Moon, 2014; Pratt, 2014), but an overlooked and underappreciated part of an undergraduate’s overall higher education success is academic advising (Light, 2001).  There has been scant research on advising within criminology and criminal justice, and this paper seeks to fill this gap by detailing reflections on the advising process within a successful and growing criminology and criminal justice program.  Strategies for advising overall will be presented as will particular situations and student needs.  Lastly, a case study of how advising works for a criminology and criminal justice department from a large, public institution located in the Southeastern United States will be discussed and demonstrate how the strategies, situations, and student needs apply.

Keywords: undergraduate advising, higher education, criminal justice, criminology, internships


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Mier, C. (2018). Adventures in Advising: Strategies, Solutions, and Situations to Student Problems in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Field. International Journal of Progressive Education, 14(1), 21-31. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2018.129.3

Harvard
Mier, C. (2018). Adventures in Advising: Strategies, Solutions, and Situations to Student Problems in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Field. International Journal of Progressive Education, 14(1), pp. 21-31.

Chicago 16th edition
Mier, Carrie (2018). "Adventures in Advising: Strategies, Solutions, and Situations to Student Problems in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Field". International Journal of Progressive Education 14 (1):21-31. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2018.129.3.

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