PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2018, Vol. 14(1) 130-147

Developing Culturally Relevant Literacy Assessments for Bahamian Children

Gertrude Tinker Sachs, Annmarie P. Jackson, Tarika Sullivan & Kamania Wynter –Hoyte

pp. 130 - 147   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2018.129.10

Published online: February 11, 2018  |   Number of Views: 117  |  Number of Download: 224


Abstract

The strong presence of culturally relevant materials in classrooms is seen as an indicator of good teaching but the development and use of these materials is under-investigated. Similarly, the actual construction and use of culturally relevant materials for literacy assessment purposes is under-reported. This paper examines the development and field-testing of culturally appropriate reading assessment materials for primary-school children in the Bahamas. The construction of culturally relevant assessment materials relies on the deep and intimate knowledge of the context and the use of the materials involves analyses from several perspectives: estimation of readability levels, creation of a range of question and activity types, analyses of students’ performance and comparison with other literacy performance indicators. This paper describes the development and field-testing of culturally relevant materials in the Bahamas.

Keywords: Culturally relevant materials; culturally relevant assessment; developing culturally relevant materials; culturally relevant pedagogy in the Bahamas


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Sachs, G.T., Jackson, A.P., Sullivan, T. & –Hoyte, K.W. (2018). Developing Culturally Relevant Literacy Assessments for Bahamian Children. International Journal of Progressive Education, 14(1), 130-147. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2018.129.10

Harvard
Sachs, G., Jackson, A., Sullivan, T. and –Hoyte, K. (2018). Developing Culturally Relevant Literacy Assessments for Bahamian Children. International Journal of Progressive Education, 14(1), pp. 130-147.

Chicago 16th edition
Sachs, Gertrude Tinker, Annmarie P. Jackson, Tarika Sullivan and Kamania Wynter –Hoyte (2018). "Developing Culturally Relevant Literacy Assessments for Bahamian Children". International Journal of Progressive Education 14 (1):130-147. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2018.129.10.

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