PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2016, Vol. 12(2) 104-111

Challenges for Progressive Education in Afghanistan: A History of Oppression and the Rising Threat of ISIS

Michael Jessee Adkins

pp. 104 - 111   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2016.008

Published online: June 01, 2016  |   Number of Views: 922  |  Number of Download: 632


Abstract

Afghanistan’s public education system has been victimized by the brutal oppression of the Taliban Regime. Schools were destroyed, teachers were executed, and women were prevented from receiving an education. However, the situation has improved in recent years. Public school enrollment rates and educational access for females have substantially increased since the fall of the Taliban Regime. A resurgence of learning is happening throughout the country. Although this resurgence is welcome, it faces unique challenges. This article examines Afghanistan’s history of educational oppression, describes post-Taliban educational trends, examines modern challenges facing public education, and provides recommendations for fostering a new hope for educational attainment among the citizens of Afghanistan.

Keywords: Afghanistan, Education, Rising, Oppression, ISIS


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Adkins, M.J. (2016). Challenges for Progressive Education in Afghanistan: A History of Oppression and the Rising Threat of ISIS. International Journal of Progressive Education, 12(2), 104-111.

Harvard
Adkins, M. (2016). Challenges for Progressive Education in Afghanistan: A History of Oppression and the Rising Threat of ISIS. International Journal of Progressive Education, 12(2), pp. 104-111.

Chicago 16th edition
Adkins, Michael Jessee (2016). "Challenges for Progressive Education in Afghanistan: A History of Oppression and the Rising Threat of ISIS". International Journal of Progressive Education 12 (2):104-111.

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