PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2020, Vol. 16(1) 11-24

Teachers’ Self-perceived Skills as the function of Gender and Teaching Experiences in the Classroom Assessment: A study in High Schools of South West Shewa Zone, Ethiopia.

Aemero Asmamaw Chalachew & Aschalew Terefe

pp. 11 - 24   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2020.228.2   |  Manu. Number: MANU-1904-30-0001

Published online: February 09, 2020  |   Number of Views: 52  |  Number of Download: 211


Abstract

This study was conducted to assess teachers’ perceptions of classroom assessment as the function of gender and teaching experiences. To this end, the researchers employed a cross-sectional survey design collecting a survey data from 197 teachers selected from seven high schools using Zhang and Burry-Stock’s (2003) modified assessment practice inventory questionnaire and an observation checklist developed by the researchers. The findings of the study revealed that there was a statistically significant gender difference only in communicating assessment results; t (173) = -6.557, p < .05. Also, there were statistically significant differences across service years in terms of constructing test items, F (2, 172) = 2907.04, p < .05; analyzing test results and test revisions, F (2, 172) = 121.401, p < .05; and communicating assessment results, F (2, 172) = 98.840, p < .05. Both in the self-perceived assessment and classroom observation results, female teachers’ were found better than male teachers in communicating assessment results. Finally, conclusions and recommendations were forwarded based on the results of this study.

Keywords: Teachers self-perceived skills, Classroom assessment, Gender, Teaching Experiences, and Ethiopia


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Chalachew, A.A. & Terefe, A. (2020). Teachers’ Self-perceived Skills as the function of Gender and Teaching Experiences in the Classroom Assessment: A study in High Schools of South West Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(1), 11-24. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2020.228.2

Harvard
Chalachew, A. and Terefe, A. (2020). Teachers’ Self-perceived Skills as the function of Gender and Teaching Experiences in the Classroom Assessment: A study in High Schools of South West Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(1), pp. 11-24.

Chicago 16th edition
Chalachew, Aemero Asmamaw and Aschalew Terefe (2020). "Teachers’ Self-perceived Skills as the function of Gender and Teaching Experiences in the Classroom Assessment: A study in High Schools of South West Shewa Zone, Ethiopia. ". International Journal of Progressive Education 16 (1):11-24. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2020.228.2.

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