PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2020, Vol. 16(3) 18-33

District Leadership Study: A Bivariate Analysis of Language Descriptors in Defining Educational Leadership Constructs

Sean Lennon

pp. 18 - 33   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2020.248.2   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2004-17-0004

Published online: June 05, 2020  |   Number of Views: 14  |  Number of Download: 48


Abstract

In 2013, a bivariate designed instrument of personality descriptors was given to a district school system to correlate difference between the teacher population and that of the administration.  Results indicated a correlated population grouping where the two groups were similar in generalized personality constructs.  Results indicate the leadership population is similar, in general, to the teachers, but some specific traits registered higher for the latter group.  An inferential analysis using a paired sample, students’ t analysis of the survey instrument confirmed that the educational leadership group was different in response than that of the teacher population.

Keywords: Teaching, Educational Leadership, Personality Constructs


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Lennon, S. (2020). District Leadership Study: A Bivariate Analysis of Language Descriptors in Defining Educational Leadership Constructs . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(3), 18-33. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2020.248.2

Harvard
Lennon, S. (2020). District Leadership Study: A Bivariate Analysis of Language Descriptors in Defining Educational Leadership Constructs . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(3), pp. 18-33.

Chicago 16th edition
Lennon, Sean (2020). "District Leadership Study: A Bivariate Analysis of Language Descriptors in Defining Educational Leadership Constructs ". International Journal of Progressive Education 16 (3):18-33. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2020.248.2.

References
  1. Babbie, E. (2010). The Basics of Social Research. 5th Edition.  Stamford, CT, Wadsworth Publishing.  [Google Scholar]
  2. Berman, E. (2006). Exercising Essential Statistics. 2nd Edition.  Washington D.C., CQ Press.  [Google Scholar]
  3. Craig, R. J. (2005). Assessing Personality and Mood with Adjective Check List Methodology: A Review.  International Journal of Testing, 5(3), 177-196. [Google Scholar]
  4. Creswell, J. W. (2020) Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research.  4th Edition.  Pearson, New York. [Google Scholar]
  5. DeCoster, J. (1998). Overview of Factor Analysis. Retrieved from http://www.stat-help.com/notes.html [Google Scholar]
  6. Digman, J. M. (1990).  Personality Structure: Emergence of the Five-Factor Model.  Annual Review of Psychology, 41(1), 417- 440 [Google Scholar]
  7. Gardner, J. W. (2000).  The Nature of Leadership.  Free Press, New York.  Reprinted in Educational Leadership.  Jossey-Bass,  San Francisco.   [Google Scholar]
  8. Garson, G. D. (2008). Students t-Test of Difference of Means. Retrieved from: http://faculty.chass.ncsu.edu/garson/PA765/ttest.htm#assume [Google Scholar]
  9. Groves, M., Fowler, F., Couper, M., Lepkowski, J., Singer, E. & Tourangeau, R. (2004). Survey Methodology.  Hoboken, NJ, Wiley_Interscience. [Google Scholar]
  10. Hakim, C. (2000).  Research Design:  Successful Designs for Social Economics Research. London, Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  11. Howard, P. J. & Howard, J. M. (2004). The Big Five Quickstart: An Introduction to the Five Factor Model of Personality for Human Resource Professionals.  Center for Applied Cognitive Studies (CentACS).  Retrieved from: http://www.centacs.com/quickstart.htm. [Google Scholar]
  12. Howell, D. C. (2004). Fundamental Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences.  Belmont, CA, Thomson Publishing. [Google Scholar]
  13. Jamieson, S. (2004). Likert Scales: How to (Ab)use them.  Medical Education, 38, 1212-1218. [Google Scholar]
  14. Judge, T. A. & Bono, J. E. (2000). Five-Factor Model of Personality and Transformational Leadership.  Journal of Applied Psychology, 85(5): 751-765. [Google Scholar]
  15. Lane, D. (2007).  Measurement Scales.  HyperStat Online.  Retrieved from: http://davidmlane.com/hyperstat/A30028.html [Google Scholar]
  16. Lennon, S. (2012).  Teacher Personality and Leadership: Exploring Potential Differences in Teaching Styles and Experience.  International Journal of Humanities and Social Science, 2(14), 38-45. [Google Scholar]
  17. Mann, M. P. (2003). The Relationship between Higher Order Personality Factors and Student Adjustment.  Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Psychiatric Association.  Published by the national Center for Research, East Lansing; MI (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED480489). [Google Scholar]
  18. Northouse, P. G. (2004).  Leadership, Theory and Practice. 3rd Edition. Sage Publications. Thousand Oaks: CA. The Oxford Handbook of the Five Factor Model. (2017). United States: Oxford University Press. [Google Scholar]
  19. Paunonen, S. V. (2003). Big Five Factors of Personality and Replicated Predictions of Behavior.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84(2), 41-424. [Google Scholar]
  20. Silova, I. & Wiseman, A. W. (2009). Educational Leadership in Context: Exploring Concepts and Complexities, Editor’s Introduction.  European Education, 41(3); 3-6. [Google Scholar]
  21. Stevens, J. P. (2001).  Applied Multivariate Statistics for the Social Sciences. 4th Edition. London, Psychology Press.  [Google Scholar]
  22. Zhang, J. Y. (2006). Confidence Interval and the students t Test.  Retrieved from: http://projectile.sv.cmu.edu/research/public/talks/t-test.htm [Google Scholar]
  23. Zuckerman, M., Kuhlman, D. M., Joireman, J., Teta, P. & Kraft, M. (1993).  A Comparison of Three Structural Models for Personality: The: Big Three, the Big Five, and the Alternative Five. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65(4). [Google Scholar]