PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2020, Vol. 16(4) 204-212

Performance of Students with Different Learning Preferences in Traditional First Semester Calculus

Erhan Selcuk Haciomeroglu & Guney Haciomeroglu

pp. 204 - 212   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2020.268.13   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2001-12-0001.R2

Published online: August 13, 2020  |   Number of Views: 15  |  Number of Download: 37


Abstract

The present study sought to examine mathematical performance of students with different learning preferences in traditionally taught first semester calculus as well as its relationship with learning preference, spatial ability, and verbal-logical reasoning ability. Data were collected from 86 students enrolled in two sections of first semester calculus at a large state university located in the Southeastern U. S. Although the study was too small to enable generalizations, the results suggest that mathematical performance is not related to learning preference, and students do not differ in their calculus performance due to a mismatch between the instructional mode and their learning preference.

Keywords: Calculus Instruction, Calculus Performance, Spatial Ability, Verbal-Logical Reasoning Ability, Learning Preference


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Haciomeroglu, E.S. & Haciomeroglu, G. (2020). Performance of Students with Different Learning Preferences in Traditional First Semester Calculus . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(4), 204-212. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2020.268.13

Harvard
Haciomeroglu, E. and Haciomeroglu, G. (2020). Performance of Students with Different Learning Preferences in Traditional First Semester Calculus . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(4), pp. 204-212.

Chicago 16th edition
Haciomeroglu, Erhan Selcuk and Guney Haciomeroglu (2020). "Performance of Students with Different Learning Preferences in Traditional First Semester Calculus ". International Journal of Progressive Education 16 (4):204-212. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2020.268.13.

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