PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2020, Vol. 16(5) 228-241

From Gallipoli to Independence: Turkish and Australian Students’ Perspectives

Heather Sharp, Talip Öztürk & Filiz Zayimoğlu Öztürk

pp. 228 - 241   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2020.277.14   |  Manu. Number: MANU-2003-02-0004

Published online: October 09, 2020  |   Number of Views: 4  |  Number of Download: 32


Abstract

Given the broad public appeal of WWI commemorations and in consideration of their inclusion in school curriculum, the question is raised of how do Turkish and Australian students view the importance and ways of commemorating the Gallipoli campaign? This comparative study, the first of its kind approaches this current gap in understanding how high school students view this historical event. The focus of this paper is to report on research conducted in Australian and Turkish* high schools during the centenary years of WWI commemorations. 185 high school students agreed to participate and share their perspectives on commemorating Gallipoli and to respond to a series of five sources provided to them as part of the research activity. How students responded to the sources and engaged with questions of commemoration is detailed throughout this paper.

Keywords: History Education, High School, World War I, Commemoration, National Identity, Emotional Nationalism


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Sharp, H., Ozturk, T. & Ozturk, F.Z. (2020). From Gallipoli to Independence: Turkish and Australian Students’ Perspectives . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(5), 228-241. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2020.277.14

Harvard
Sharp, H., Ozturk, T. and Ozturk, F. (2020). From Gallipoli to Independence: Turkish and Australian Students’ Perspectives . International Journal of Progressive Education, 16(5), pp. 228-241.

Chicago 16th edition
Sharp, Heather, Talip Ozturk and Filiz Zayimoglu Ozturk (2020). "From Gallipoli to Independence: Turkish and Australian Students’ Perspectives ". International Journal of Progressive Education 16 (5):228-241. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2020.277.14.

References
  1. Apple, M. (2004). Ideology and curriculum (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge Falmer. [Google Scholar]
  2. Ata, B. (2001). “How shall we teach the Gallipoli war?” Türk Yurdu Journal, 164, 23-29. [Google Scholar]
  3. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (2018). ‘History Curriculum Rationale,’ accessed 09 July, 2018 from https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/humanities-and-social-sciences/history/) [Google Scholar]
  4. Barnard, C. (2003). Language, ideology, and Japanese history textbooks. London, United Kingdom: Routledge Curzon. [Google Scholar]
  5. Boréus, K. and Bergström, G. (2017). From analysing text and discourse: Eight approaches for the Social Sciences. London, UK: Sage. [Google Scholar]
  6. Çoban, F. E. (2011). The cognitive and perceptive level of secondary school students related to Çanakkale wars and the teaching of Çanakkale wars. (Unpublished Masters Dissertation). Çanakkale 18 Mart University, Turkey.  [Google Scholar]
  7. Dunlop, E.J., and Palfrey, A.E. (1932). New syllabus history for seventh grade. Brisbane, Australia: William Brooks. [Google Scholar]
  8. Fairclough, N., and Wodak, R. (1997). Critical discourse analysis. In T.A. van Dijk (Ed.), Discourse as social interaction (pp. 258-284). London, United Kingdom: Sage Publications.  [Google Scholar]
  9. Gitlin, A. (2006). (Re)visioning knowledge, politics, and change: Educational poetics. In L. Weis, C. McCarthy, & G. Dimitriadis (Eds.), Ideology, curriculum, and the new sociology of education: Revisiting the work of Michael Apple (pp. 167-184). New York, NY: Routledge. [Google Scholar]
  10. Henderson, D. (2019). The nature of values and why they matter in the teaching and learning of history. In T. Allender, A, Clark and R. Parkes (Eds.), Historical thinking for history teachers (pp. 102-116). Crows Nest, Australia: Allen and Unwin. [Google Scholar]
  11. High School History Course Curriculum. (2018). High School curriculum for 9.10.11.12. Grades. URL: http://mufredat.meb.gov.tr/ProgramDetay.aspx?PID=344 [Google Scholar]
  12. Hsieh, H-F. and Shannon, S. E. (2005). Three approaches to qualitative content analysis. Qualitative Health Research 15(9), 1277-1288. [Google Scholar]
  13. Kaymakcı, S. (2010). The Effect of Using Worksheets in Social Studies Education on Students’ Academic Achievement and Attitudes Toward the Course, Gazi University/Turkey, Unpublished PhD Dissertation. [Google Scholar]
  14. Lévesque, S. (2005). “In search of a purpose for school history”. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 37(3), 349-358.  [Google Scholar]
  15. Lowenthal, D. (1985). The Past is a Foreign Country, Cambridge University Press.  [Google Scholar]
  16. Martin, J.R., and Wodak, R. 2003. Re/reading the past: Critical and functional perspectives on time and value. Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins. [Google Scholar]
  17. Taylor, T. (2019). Historical consciousness and the Australian curriculum. In T. Allender, A, Clark and R. Parkes (Eds.), Historical thinking for history teachers (pp. 3-17). Crows Nest, Australia: Allen and Unwin. [Google Scholar]
  18. Turan, R. and Ulusoy, K. (2013). The place and importance of history in social studies. Ankara, Turkey: Pegema Publishing. [Google Scholar]
  19. Wertsch, J. V. (1997). “Narrative tools of history and identity.” Culture and Psychology, 3(1), 5-10. [Google Scholar]
  20. Wodak, R. (2004). Critical discourse analysis. In C. Searle, G. Gobo, J.F. Gubrium, & D. Silverman (Eds.), Qualitative research practice (pp. 197-213). London, United Kingdom: Sage. [Google Scholar]
  21. Wodak, R., & de Cillia, R. (2006). Politics and language: Overview. In K. Brown (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Language & Linguistics (2nd ed., pp. 707-719). Oxford, United Kingdom: Elsevier. [Google Scholar]
  22. Yazıcı, N. (2013). A critical approach to the instruction of Dardanelles campaign in secondary education curricula and text books [in Turkish]. Hacettepe University Journal of Education, 28(2), 535-550. [Google Scholar]