International Journal of Progressive Education
Abbreviation: IJPE | ISSN (Print): 1554-5210 | DOI: 10.29329/ijpe

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2021, Vol. 17(1) 145-157

The Impact of Awakening Perception of Learners’ Comprehension on English Learning via Regularly Listening to Songs in English

Mehmet Temur

pp. 145 - 157   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijpe.2020.329.10

Published online: February 01, 2021  |   Number of Views: 7  |  Number of Download: 26


Abstract

“Why can’t I recognize and understand the words clearly rehearsed by the teacher while lecturing or musicians while singing or the native speakers of English while dialoguing?” This situation has been a great challenge and an issue not only for the learners of English Language at English preparatory school at Inonu University but also for others as well.  To answer this question, researcher supposes that it is essential that teachers should improve awareness of learners in the perception of comprehension in audio-visual, listening and speaking skill through constant listening to music in English for a certain period of time. To achieve this expectation, the implementation of new teaching style was applied to the class of 29 students via using listening activity with 40 different chosen songs from varies classical and contemporary musicians in English in constant and regular repetition just after each course ends. This process lasted about 10 weeks’ time. Constituted with 10- different questions for a pre-test and post-test form of instrumental measurement based on listening activity as an uncommon style of teaching was administered to 29 students of varies disciplines; engineering, international relations and philosophy in preparatory school. Thus, the aim of this qualitative and quantitative research is to evaluate to what extent the impact of this teaching style is on the learners’ listening and speaking skills. The data obtained were analyzed through chi-square analysis test. Its research design setting is one-way pretest and posttest experimental single group study. The data obtained were analyzed through SPSS package programmer. The results gained indicated that there were significant differences between pretest and the posttest figures after application of meta cognitive awareness raising strategy (mean from 3,0625 to 7000) based on time variable. There is no important difference in mean between the genders; males from 16 to 40, total 56. Females from 13 to 29, total 42. Finally, this implementation related perception awakening in English teaching classroom experiment has resulted in outcomes fruitfully and can be recommended to be applied to the classes in other institutions for the learners of English Language to increase their awareness of perception during the educational processes.

Keywords: Perception; Awakening; Listening to Music; Understanding; English Teaching


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Temur, M. (2021). The Impact of Awakening Perception of Learners’ Comprehension on English Learning via Regularly Listening to Songs in English . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(1), 145-157. doi: 10.29329/ijpe.2020.329.10

Harvard
Temur, M. (2021). The Impact of Awakening Perception of Learners’ Comprehension on English Learning via Regularly Listening to Songs in English . International Journal of Progressive Education, 17(1), pp. 145-157.

Chicago 16th edition
Temur, Mehmet (2021). "The Impact of Awakening Perception of Learners’ Comprehension on English Learning via Regularly Listening to Songs in English ". International Journal of Progressive Education 17 (1):145-157. doi:10.29329/ijpe.2020.329.10.

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