PEN Academic Publishing   |  ISSN: 1554-5210

Original article | International Journal of Progressive Education 2016, Vol. 12(1) 64-72

Investigation of the Secondary School Students’ Images of Scientists

Abuzer Akgün

pp. 64 - 72   |  Manu. Number: ijpe.2016.018

Published online: February 01, 2016  |   Number of Views: 135  |  Number of Download: 200


Abstract

The overall purpose of this study is to explore secondary school students’ images of scientists. In addition to this comprehensive purpose, it is also investigated that if these students’ current images of scientists and those in which they see themselves as a scientist in the near future are consistent or not. The study was designed in line with the case study research in a qualitatively manner. The working group is of totally 175 (95 boys, 81 girls) secondary school students enrolled in the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grade of a public school located in the province of Adıyaman. Data were collected through drawings during the drawing activity and interviews conducted with the selected drawings’ owners in order to explore images of scientists. Elements take place in the drawings which are investigated by two of science education expert and one of art expert were analyzed in accordance with certain categories appearing in the related literature. Furthermore, fifteen pictures among others were randomly selected and their owners were asked to imagine themselves as a scientist in the near future and consequently depict and draw on a paper their imagination. For further information, interviews were carried out to determine the differences between the first drawings and the second ones. It is concluded that 68% of secondary school students draw a natural scientist or scientists, 2,28% of those draw a social scientist or scientists and finally the rest draw no scientist. The rate of drawings including only one scientist is %66,85 while the rate of drawings possess more than two scientists %4,57. On the other hand, the rest of the drawings are without any scientist. There is no obvious difference in all categories selected in the context of the study according to grade level and gender. The study revealed the possibility of the fact that secondary school students’ images of scientist are substantially formed by the content of prevailing mainbooks and workbooks including activities in the classrooms. When talking about scientists, the majority of the students depict a naturel scientist who works more often in the laboratory, especially male and bespectacled. In addition, students mostly consider people as a scientist who work in the field of natural sciences. Consequently, doing science is an individual effort in an indoor environment rather than a set of group activity. Finally, data from interviews show that most of the students have a dream of being scientist in their future careers.

Keywords: Nature of Science, Images of Scientists, Drawing Technique


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Akgun, A. (2016). Investigation of the Secondary School Students’ Images of Scientists. International Journal of Progressive Education, 12(1), 64-72.

Harvard
Akgun, A. (2016). Investigation of the Secondary School Students’ Images of Scientists. International Journal of Progressive Education, 12(1), pp. 64-72.

Chicago 16th edition
Akgun, Abuzer (2016). "Investigation of the Secondary School Students’ Images of Scientists". International Journal of Progressive Education 12 (1):64-72.

References
  1. AAAS American Association for the Advancement of Science (1990) Science for all Americans (New York: Oxford University Press). [Google Scholar]
  2. AAAS American Association for the Advancement of Science (1993) Benchmarks for Science Literacy: A Project 2061 Report. (New York: Oxford University Press). [Google Scholar]
  3. Fouad Abd-El-Khalick & Norman G. Lederman (2000) Improving science teachers' conceptions of nature of science: a critical review of the literature, International Journal of Science Education, 22:7, 665-701, DOI: 10.1080/09500690050044044 [Google Scholar]
  4. Driver, R., Leach, J., Millar, R., & Scott, P. (1996). Young peoples’s images of science. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press. [Google Scholar]
  5. Laugksch, C. R. (2000). Scientific literacy: A conceptual overview. Science Education. 84(1), 71 – 94. [Google Scholar]
  6. Lederman, N. G. (1992). Students’ and teachers’ conceptions of the nature of science: a review of the research. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 29, 331-359. [Google Scholar]
  7. (NRC) National Research Council (1996) National Science Education Standards (Washinton, DC: National Academic Press). [Google Scholar]
  8. (NSTA) National Science Teachers Association (1982) Science-Technology-Society: Science Education for the 1980s (An NSTA position statement) (Washington, DC: NSTA). [Google Scholar]
  9. Lynn D. Newton & Douglas P. Newton (1998) Primary children's conceptions of science and the scientist: is the impact of a National Curriculum breaking down the stereotype?, International Journal of Science Education, 20:9, 1137-1149, DOI: 10.1080/0950069980200909 [Google Scholar]
  10. Korkmaz, H., & Kavak, G. (2010). Primary school students’ images of science and scientists. Elementary Education Online, 9(3), 1055-1079. [Google Scholar]
  11. Junqing Zhai, Jennifer Ann Jocz & Aik-Ling Tan (2014) ‘Am I Like a Scientist?’: Primary children's images of doing science in school, International Journal of Science Education, 36:4, 553-576, DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2013.791958 [Google Scholar]